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Charles Castro

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Sergeant Charles Castro, New York Police Department, is the author of NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD.

According to the book description of NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD, “When a New York senator was issued a traffic ticket by a New York City cop, his call to a top-ranking member of the NYPD for a favor started a chain of events that resulted in the horrific murder of an innocent young woman, Bliss Verdon. Police sergeant Charles Castro was singled out to be the scapegoat in a cover-up of the NYPD s role in the events that led to the murder. But, as a tough-as-nails cop, he had other ideas and was not about to roll over for the police brass.

Though it seems more like a Hollywood movie, this real-life story of Castro s efforts to prove his innocence is an unprecedented look at wanton acts of police misconduct and rampant corruption.

NYPD Blue Lies has it all: Castro s controversial ex-wife (also a cop) who posed for Playboy magazine; police executions ; gunfights; hostage-taking; backstabbing; gossip; brawling; group sex; racism... It s a darker side of New York s Finest, as well as a scathing look at America s Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Having served under three New York City mayors and a parade of police commissioners, Castro has come to recognize one common thread connecting them all: their utter lack of leadership for both the city they served and the heroes in blue they were sworn to command.”

 

One reader of NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD said, “This spell binding book was just to good to put down. The action and reality it displayed was so mind blowing, it gave me a whole new perspective on what real life is like for our fearless men and women in blue uniform. The personal information and upbringing of the author was also heart breaking at times, it made you think twice about was going on in his life. However, it is worth reading not once but twice. One of the best investments I have ever made regarding books.”

 

One reader of NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD said, “In your face, gritty, straight from the hip, can't put the book down reading. A NYPD time capsule. Things of changed since then. Change that came with a price. For those involved with NYPD now and than... I salute ALL of the UNSUNG HEROES.”

 

One reader of NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD said, “This book hits the nail on the head with the trials and tribulation of being a person of color in the NYPD. From personal experience, i can relate to the authors treatment of officers of color. I recommend this book to anyone who has law enforcement aspirations, a desire to learn about City Politics or an interest in Civil Rights issues in policing. A real page turner; finished the book in 3 days.”

 

One reader of NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD said, “As a retired white police officer, I Got to work with this Sergeant for only a short period of time But can tell you that there is a lot of validity to his story. This book gives you an inside scoop of the everyday pressure not only with the public but within the four walls of the station houses. Love the chapter with the Hostage.”


NYPD Blue Lies: The Shocking True Story of Racism, Corruption, Cover-Ups and Murder in the NYPD
Charles Castro  More Info

From the History of the NYPD:

A committee on Police, etc., of both Boards of Aldermen, to whom was referred a resolution relative to the re-organization of the Police Department, presented their report, and the draft of a law thereon, on February 12,1838, both being laid on the table. The committee directed their principal attention tot he organization of the Watch. "The welfare of the city is deeply interested in its efficiency, while the taxpayer is aware that the expenditures in this department amounted last year to about $262,000." The committee expressed their belief that this branch of the Police required that a thorough system of subordination, and close and active inspection,, should be introduced into its administration, if the protection of property and the preservation of the public peace were to be promptly and effectually secured. The adoption of the new draft of the law, accompanying the report, was recommended, which, when carried out, it was claimed, would introduce regulation and order, "where before very little of those characteristics existed;" dismissed Watchmen would no longer be able, after having neglected their duty, to find employment in another district; and the rules by which Captains of the Watch discharged their duties, would not be as diverse as the respective watch-houses the occupied. The report continues: "The Roundsmen now go out to visit the posts two at a time; this service can as well be performed by a single Watchmen, and inducement to gossip and idleness is removed."

 

The change proposed buy the committee had, it was alleged, the additional merit of economy, by effecting a saving of twenty thousand dollars annually to the city, while the committee were confident that the Watch department would be better organized, and more effective than the system it was designed to supplant.

 

The charter had given full power to the Mayor to appoint any number of Marshals. By act of the legislature, April 8, 1813, this power was limited to the number of sixty, and subsequently to one hundred. The committee claimed that the necessity constantly arising from the increase of population and business demonstrated the propriety of the Common Council possessing the power to fix on the number of those officers, so as to be appointed by the mayor from time to time. It seemed equally just, three committee were of opinion, that the Mayor should have power to appoint Special Constables, competent to arrest offenders and preserve the public peace. It was also deemed necessary o add to the number of Special Justices for preserving the peace. The Common council, it was asserted, should have been vested with this power. The Board, in view of these facts, was advised to take the necessary steps to procure the passage of an act by the legislature securing the adoption of the above suggestions.

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