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David Duchesneau

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David Duchesneau was honorably discharged from the United States Marine Corps in 1970.  In 1971, he was appointed into the New Hampshire State Police. He earned a degree in Criminology.  During his tenure, he was selected to represent New England in a special 13 week intense training course at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. After his law enforcement career, David opened a Private Investigative/Security Agency and Consulting Firm. He is certified as an International Investigator and Fraud Consultant.  His investigative/security experience and knowledge is second to none.  He is qualified as an Expert Witness and has written numerous articles on how to conduct investigations in the private sector. David is a proud member of the NH Retired Law Enforcement Association (Life Member), Veterans of Foreign Wars( VFW) (Life Member), The American Legion, Marine Corps Association, Marine Corps League, ASIS International, INTELLENET and the NRA. David Duchesneau is the author of Uniforms.

According to the book description of Uniforms, it "spans an era in a boys life that tells about his experiences growing up in a small New England town, from his childhood years, attending parochial school, to his adolescent years, continuing parochial school and becoming an active member of a drum and bugle corps for ten years. The story continues into early adulthood when he enlisted into the United States Marine Corps, through boot camp, and then serving two tours of duty, 1969 through 1970, in Vietnam. It is a factual description of his life as he grew up and through his experiences of wearing many uniforms, which shaped his life and future forever. The language used in this book is sometimes graphic, with four-letter expressions. However, it is the exact language that was so commonly used during that era.

 

The author does his best at explaining what it was like to grow up in the late 1950s and the 1960s, attending school taught only by nuns. Then while still attending school, joining a drum and bugle corps and all his experiences traveling around New England and Canada, performing in parades and field competitions. At eighteen years old, he enlisted into the Armed Forces, United States Marine Corps, and explains what life was like at eighteen years old in 1968 to go through boot camp at Parris Island in South Carolina. As his marine infantry training continued, the author describes, in detail and in his own words, what it was like as the Marine Corps prepared him and many others like him for combat in Vietnam. The author then describes, to the best of his recollection and ability, what life was like in Vietnam in 1969 while he was attached to a marine combat unit in Quang Tri Province of Southern Vietnam. The book goes on to describe how, at the end of 1969, he was redeployed to another combat unit south of Da Nang. The author stayed in Vietnam until mid-August of 1970 and then was released from active duty and returned home at the age of twenty-one. This book speaks from the heart and mind of everyone who has ever had the experience of attending a Catholic school with nuns, all those who were ever so fortunate to be a member of a drum and bugle corps, and all those combat veterans who served in Vietnam and experienced the rigors and sorrows of that war."

About the New Hampshire State Police
According to the New Hampshire State Police, "On July 9, 1869, Governor Stearns was presented with a hand written piece of legislation that would eventually lead to the formation of the New Hampshire State Police. The legislation, entitled "An Act to Create a State Police in Certain Cases," outlined just what would constitute the proposed State Police. During this historical period, the various local law enforcement authorities chose not to promote compliance with the liquor laws. Therefore, one of the primary functions of the proposed legislation was the enforcement of these "anti-drinking" laws by the State Police.

 

During the first year of 1937, the New Hampshire State Police established its headquarters in the State House. At that time, the initial ranks were comprised of individuals who had been members of the uniformed branch of the New Hampshire Motor Vehicle Department and criminal investigators then employed through the State Attorney Generals office. The first Superintendent of the Department of State Police was George Colbath, the Sheriff of Coos County. During 1937 the complement of troopers reached an authorized forty-eight men.  In 1962, the New Hampshire State Police became a division of the newly developed New Hampshire Department of Safety."

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