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David E. Hatch

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About the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

According to the Undersheriff Douglas C. Gillespie, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department “has come a long way since its inception in 1973. On July 1, 1973 action of the Nevada Legislature merged the Clark County Sheriff’s Department and the Las Vegas Police Department into the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

 

At that time, the Las Vegas Police Department was the largest police agency in Nevada, with 394 commissioned and 82 civilian personnel, having responsibility for 52.6 square miles. The Clark County Sheriff’s Department was the largest sheriff’s department in Nevada with 387 commissioned and 124 civilian personnel with nearly 8,000 square miles of jurisdiction. The population of both the city and county was approximately

270,500.

        

Today, while the jurisdiction size has remained relatively unchanged, the number of personnel to police that jurisdiction has changed considerably. This department now serves a population of nearly 1.5 million residents and 40 million tourists visit each year. We now have 2,635 commissioned police officers, 747 commissioned corrections officers, and over 1,600 civilian personnel working in both the police and

corrections fields.”

Detective David E. Hatch spent more than 27 years with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. David Hatch joined the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in 1969 after discharge from the U.S. Marine Corps.  In 1980, as a detective, he joined the homicide section.  During his time with homicide, he investigated over 400 homicides and 125 officer-involved shootings.

 

After retirement in 1997, David Hatch has concentrated on law enforcement related writing and teaching. He is the author of Officer-Involved Shootings and Use of Force: Practical Investigative Techniques, Second Edition (Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigations). 

 

David Hatch’s book, now in its second edition, “continues to provide sound and sober models, protocols, and procedures to handle the highly charged fall-out from officer involved shootings. Written by cops for cops, it is designed to address the needs of the agency, the rights of the employee, and the concerns of the public, and give law enforcement the policies and tools to properly investigate and document this high profile area.”

 

Jerry Keller, President of the Major Cities’ Police Chiefs’ Association, can “think of no one else better qualified to write” about investigating officer-involved shootings and police-related deaths. Lt. Craig Dodd of the Fort Collins Police Department states that his agency practices many of the philosophies and protocols developed by Hatch over the years. Officer-Involved Shootings and Use of Force: Practical Investigative Techniques, Second Edition (Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigations): Presents a standardized protocol for consistent investigations of officer-involved shootings; Provides updated case histories from the author's experience and from high profile current events; Includes the latest findings on excited delirium syndrome; Offers insightful recommendations for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; and, Features information on the proper handling of media and public information policy

 

According to Larry Moore, Certified Emergency Manager (Knoxville, TN), Officer-Involved Shootings and Use of Force: Practical Investigative Techniques, Second Edition (Practical Aspects of Criminal and Forensic Investigation) contains “an outstanding presentation of guidelines, authority, and assignment responsibility to establish the best organizational team structure to investigate [officer-involved] shootings.”

 

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