Police Books

Frank Lione

Home | By Police Department | By Police Officer | By Police Subjects | Law Enforcement Books by State | Other Law Enforcement Writers | Poetry, Prayers & Articles | FAQs | Contact Us | Site Map

F. P. Lione is the pen name of husband-and-wife writing team Frank Lione and Pam Lione. Frank Lione is a veteran of the New York Police Department.  His wife, Pam, recently left her job as a medical sonographer in vascular ultrasound to stay home with their two sons. The husband and wife team comprising the pen name F.P. Lione has authored three books in the “Midtown Blues” series: “The Deuce,” “The Crossroads” and “Skells.”  The fictional novels tell the story of Tony Cavalucci.  The character, Cavalucci, is an 11 year veteran of the NYPD and recent convert to Christianity.

According to the book description of Skells “The NYPD has a name for the perps who live on the streets. They are called skells, people who cause trouble for cops trying to keep the peace. Night after night of run-ins with the skells takes its toll on NYPD cop Tony Cavalucci, who's just trying to see them as people who need compassion. But with his co-workers mocking his newfound caring attitude, Tony is finding it hard to keep up with a job that too often drags him down. Meanwhile, Tony finds little solace from his family, which is at war with itself, creating wounds that will be hard to heal. Seeing the mess his family has become, Tony's determined not to make the same mistakes. But after he learns of events from his father's past, will Tony change his perspective? Book 3 in the Midtown Blue series, Skells combines grit with an unexpectedly engaging vulnerability to make this story of a rugged cop a captivating read.”

 

According to the book description of The Deuce, “Tony Cavalucci is a New York City police officer fighting for his life. The crime and corruption he sees on the job combined with a failing family life leave Tony feeling drained, lost, and frightfully alone, causing him to look for happiness in all the wrong places.  Just when he is about to give up, Tony is partnered with Joe Fiore, another Italian-American cop who exudes the strength and confidence that Tony has been searching for. Though wary of his new partner, Tony finds that the day-to-day toils of his job force him to swallow his pride and look to Fiore for help. Writing with grit, freshness, and authenticity, authors Frank and Pam Lione, born-and-bred native New Yorkers themselves, bring to life the loneliness that haunts even New York's finest.”

According to the book description of Clear Blue Sky, “It's the beginning of a gorgeous September in the City that Never Sleeps. Summer may be officially over, but Labor Day Weekend means ethnic festivals and dancing the streets and lots of overtime for police officer Tony Cavalucci. When crowd control gets unusually dangerous, Tony starts to wonder why he even does this kind of work. And going home doesn't bring him any more respect. His neurotic and dramatic family disapproves of both Tony's fiancé and his new-found faith. All this foreshadows what's about to come to the people of New York on September 11, 2001. Normal day-to-day events and fantastic weather lead up to the most difficult day in the city's history. Now Tony finds himself in brand new territory. As he fights to survive and help others survive as well, Tony learns all over what faith means, what family means, and what life itself means. The author of this highly compelling novel is an ex-cop who survived the World Trade Center rescue efforts. Consequently, the storytelling throughout the book rings with authenticity. All of this makes for a fast-paced and deeply moving page-turner that is at times funny, at times horrible, and always full of humanity, compassion, and the presence of God. The Liones offer their very best work in Clear Blue Sky.

According to the book description of The Crossroads, “In New York City, Times Square is known as the crossroads of the world. It's where everyone comes to ring in the New Year-the good and the bad, the beautiful and the gritty . . . and the NYPD. But for Tony Cavalucci, an NYPD cop, the holiday season means long hours and little sleep. Instead of joining the countdown, Tony finds himself trapped between his feuding family and his new girlfriend, Michele. After a terrible family fight, Tony runs head on into his struggle against alcohol and wonders if taking a drink would solve all his problems. Or is there another way? Will his family come around or does continuing his relationship with Michele mean giving up on the people he loves? As edgy as life on the streets, The Crossroads, book two in the Midtown Blue series, follows the continuing struggle of one rugged cop.”


Clear Blue Sky: A Novel
F. P. Lione  More Info

Skells: A Novel (Midtown Blue)
F. P. Lione  More Info

The Crossroads: A Novel (Midtown Blue)
F. P. Lione  More Info

The Deuce: A Novel (Midtown Blue)
F. P. Lione  More Info

About the New York Police Department (NYPD):

The first law-enforcement officer began to patrol the trails and paths of New York City when it was known as New Amsterdam, and was a Dutch settlement and fort in the year 1625. This lawman was known as a "Schout – fiscal" (sheriff – attorney) and was charged with keeping the peace, settling minor disputes, and warning colonists if fires broke out at night. The first Schout was a man named Johann Lampo.

 

The Rattle Watch was a group of colonists during the Dutch era (1609 - 1664) who patrolled from sunset until dawn. They carried weapons, lanterns and wooden rattles (that are similar to the ratchet noisemakers used during New Year celebrations). The rattles made a very loud, distinctive sound and were used to warn farmers and colonists of threatening situations. Upon hearing this sound, the colonists would rally to defend themselves or form bucket-brigades to put out fires. The rattles were used because whistles had not yet been invented. The Rattle Watchmen also are believed to have carried lanterns that had green glass inserts. This was to help identify them while they were on patrol at night (as there were no streetlights at that time). When they returned to their Watch House from patrol, they hung their lantern on a hook by the front door to show that the Watchman was present in the Watch House. Today, green lights are still hung outside the entrances of Police Precincts as a symbol that the "Watch" is present and vigilant.

 

When the High Constable of New York City, Jacob Hays retired from service in 1844, permission was granted by the Governor of the state to the Mayor of the City to create a Police Department. A force of approximately 800 men under the first Chief of Police, George W. Matsell, began to patrol the City in July of 1845. They wore badges that had an eight-pointed star (representing the first 8 paid members of the old Watch during Dutch times). The badges had the seal of the City in their center and were made of stamped copper.

 

Source:

nycpolicemuseum.org

/html/faq.html#begin

© 2004 - 2018 Hi Tech Criminal Justice

 

Criminal Justice Online

Home/Join | List | Next | Previous | Random

Sponsored by Criminal Justice Online

2006 Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E. Foster

Disclaimer