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Frederick (Eric) C. Morton

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Detective Frederick (Eric) C. Morton grew up in a middle class neighborhood in New Orleans with a good family background and virtues. His father raised him with a very stern hand, but taught him always to help others, never turn anyone away who needed the help, never let your guard down, and to always put your family above all. His mother raised him to be a caring person dedicated to family values and God. All during his childhood, he loved to watch and play police, but never thought he would ever develop into that line of work. After joining the military and a few years of college, he became bored with life until a chance encounter with two New Orleans Police Detectives. Infatuated with the idea, they talked him into joining the police department. He is married with three wonderful children, and since his inception in the police department, Eric has held many positions and has attempted to make an impact wherever he went.

 

Lawrence (Larry) E. Green was born in Natchez, Mississippi, and was raised as a child in New Orleans, Louisiana. He is married and is the father of two children. After graduating high school, he worked as a mechanic for ten years and decided to fulfill his life long dream of being a New Orleans Police Officer. Now he has over ten years of Law Enforcement experience, where the latter part he has held the position of a Homicide Investigator for the New Orleans Police Department.

 

Both the authors began working together when they headed up an international investigation involving the theft of cemetery artifacts. This investigation led them into a world of supernatural occurrences that changed their life forever. Although their novel, Lost Souls in the City of the Dead,” is completely fictional, it was inspired by this true to life investigation.

One reader of Lost Souls in the Cities of the Dead said, “I live in New Orleans, and was excited about reading this book written by two New Orleans Detectives. When all the news broke about the New Orleans cemetery thefts, it broke my heart. Reading this book gave me a sense of justice in that the citizens of New Orleans will not tolerate this kind of evil.”


Lost Souls in the Cities of the Dead
Lawrence E. Green  More Info

About the New Orleans Police Department

New Orleans became a part of the United States by the Louisiana Purchase on December 20, 1803. The city limits at that time were in the restricted boundaries of Canal Street on the South, Esplanade Street on the North, the Ramparts on the West and the levee on the East. Beyond that, there was nothing but swamps and plantations. In 1804 came the patrol militia under James Pitot, the then Mayor of New Orleans. The Guard Deville (City Watch) followed in 1806 but was abolished in 1808. Militia patrols were again established. By 1817, with the growth of the city, the number of constables increased to 46 and for the first time, the city was divided into police districts - French Quarter, Faubourg’s Treme, St. Mary and Marigny. A Guard House was placed in each district.

Today, the New Orleans Police Department is organized into five bureaus who report to the Superintendent of Police: Bureau of Investigations; Operations Bureau; Criminal Intelligence Bureau; Public Integrity Bureau; and, Administrative and Support Bureau.  A deputy chief in charge of policing and planning also reports to the New Orleans Police Department Superintendent of Police.

The Operations Bureau is the largest, with over 17 divisions and 1700 commissioned police officers.

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