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Henry M. Holden

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Henry M. Holden is the author of numerous adult and children books as well as more than 600 magazine articles on Aviation History.  In 1994, he rece3ived the New Jersey Institute of Technology’s Author’s Award.  Henry Holden was a deputy sheriff for the Orange County Sheriff’s Department (Florida) from 1979 to 1981. 

Henry M. Holden is the author of: To Be a U.S. Air Force Pilot; FBI 100 Years: An Unofficial History; Rescue Helicopters and Aircraft; Hovering: The History of the Whirly-Girls: International Women Helicopter Pilots; To Be a Crime Scene Investigator; American Women of Flight: Pilots and Pioneers; Crime-Fighting Aircraft; Black Hawk Helicopter; Air Force Aircraft; Fire-Fighting Aircraft and Smoke Jumpers; Her Mentor Was an Albatross: The Autobiography of Pioneer Pilot Harriet Quimby; Ladybirds: The Untold Story of Women Pilots in America; Navy Combat Aircraft and Pilots; The Fabulous Ford Tri-Motors; The Tragedy of the Space Shuttle Challenger; Woodrow Wilson; Wisconsin; The Persian Gulf War; Living and Working Aboard the International Space Station; The Boeing 247: The First Modern Commercial Airplane; The American Alligator; Coast Guard Rescue and Patrol Aircraft; New Jersey; Ladybirds II The Continuing Story of American Women in Aviation; Aerial drug wars: The Story of U.S. Customs Aviation; The Legacy of the DC-3; Trailblazing Astronaut John Glenn; Triumph over Disaster Aboard Apollo 13 Pioneering Astronaut Sally Ride; To Be a U.S. Secret Service Agent; To Be an FBI Special Agent; and, The Supersonic X-15 and High-Tech NASA Aircraft.

According to the book description of To Be a U.S. Secret Service Agent, “The Secret Service was established after the Civil War by the Treasury Department, originally to protect American currency against counterfeiters. After the assassination of President William McKinley in 1901, Congress directed the Secret Service to protect the President of the United States. Protection remains the primary mission of the United States Secret Service.

It takes a special type of individual to be a U.S. Secret Service agent, one willing to “take a bullet” to preserve the ideals on which the United States was founded. To Be a U.S. Secret Service Agent lifts the curtain for a look inside this secretive law enforcement agency, including the highly selective recruiting, the intense training, and the specialized weapons and equipment used to protect current and past Presidents, Vice Presidents, their families, and visiting heads of state.”

According to one reader of To Be a U.S. Secret Service Agent, “As a U.S. Secret Service UD applicant, I would highly recommend this book. As a former teacher and peace officer, I would recommend this book be in every middle school, high school and university. Mr. Holden has explained, through words and photographs, the application process, the training, and duties of the Secret Service agent, uniform division officer, and other members that comprise the most professional and honorable division of American law enforcement. As an applicant, it helped me learn about the position that I was applying for and helped me articulate my understanding to the agents I interviewed with. The information that I obtained in this book helped me score 97% on the tests and make it to panel. Thank you Mr. Holden for writing this book.”

According to the book description of FBI 100 Years: An Unofficial History, “On the eve of the FBI's centenary, this book offers the first comprehensive illustrated account of the Bureaus 100-year history. Granted unprecedented access to the FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., and academy at Quantico, Virginia, author Henry M. Holden presents a rare inside view of the agency’s workings, as well as a compelling, closely observed picture of its ever-changing role, powers, notable cases, and controversies through the years. FBI 100 Years chronicles the Bureaus successes and failures from its early days as Teddy Roosevelt’s trust-busting detective force to the increased emphasis on counterterrorism the post 9/11 world. Along the way, Holden revisits the gangster era and the days of McCarthyism, the unmaking of the Mob, and the disastrous standoffs at Ruby Ridge and Waco. The famous and the infamous make their appearances in the story, colorful characters such as John Dillinger and "Machine Gun" Kelly, J. Edgar Hoover and turncoat spy Robert Hansen. With added features including an exploration of the 200 categories of federal crimes that fall within the Bureaus purview, all the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives lists since the first in 1949, and an entertaining look at the FBI in popular culture, this is the most thorough and authoritative book ever written about the principal law enforcement arm of the United States Department of Justice. It is truly the first book to do justice to the worlds most famous, but actually little-known law enforcement agencies in the world.”

According to the book description of To Be an FBI Special Agent, “FBI Special Agents are a rare and special breed. From a large pool of applicants, the FBI determines the best candidates and puts them through intensive training in numerous disciplines and fields of study. Their training makes them specialists in areas such as counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and cybercrime. To Be An FBI Special Agent provides thorough coverage of the agent training process and shows what it takes to become an agent. Candid photos of the FBI's training center in Quantico, Virginia, give the reader an unprecedented look behind the scenes.”

According to one reader of To Be an FBI Special Agent, “This is the fourth book I have read which is intended to prepare the reader for, and generally teach about, the FBI special agent hiring and training processes. Of those that I have read, this is the only one that doesn't feel like it copied 99% of its contents straight out of an FBI manual.”

According to the book description of To Be a Crime Scene Investigator, “If the devil’s in the details, then the crime scene investigator’s got him: conducting searches, collecting evidence, photographing, scrutinizing, analyzing—pursuing the culprit right down to the last scrap of proof. Whether you’d like to become a crime scene investigator or simply want to see what it takes, look no further than this book. 

Like a top-notch forensics expert, author Henry M. Holden traces the path that crime scene investigators follow as they learn and ply their trade. His behind-the-scenes look takes us from application to training, crime scene to lab, revealing the fine points of securing, examining, and processing evidence; identifying victims, and reenacting the crime; conducting police lineups and interviews, and administering polygraphs; and forensics and evidence analysis.”

According to one reader of To Be a Crime Scene Investigator, “This book caught my attention as I browsed around the bargain books section, and the attractive price of six bucks won me over for the heck of it. I started reading To Be a Crime Scene Investigator, and it is a very entertaining and also informative read. The book is broken down into five parts and is very well-organized read. Part One deals with how somebody can become a Crime Scene Investigator in several ways via stepping stones, and the author suggests a few easiest routes to that although college education is strongly emphasized as long as the majors are the right ones.

There is also an outline how one can become a police(wo)man. There is a detailed, although not in depth, array of information applying to several areas such as physical regimen, battery tests, and firearms experience that serve as a warning to be prepared for if one is interested in becoming a Crime Scene Investigator. Mind you, I am pretty much a novice when it comes to knowing information like this, so I am only placing myself in the shoes of a high school kid who is exploring future careers in law enforcement.

The second part gets into the main point of the book: Becoming a Crime Scene Investigator. This part covers the basic ideas of training and education that makes one a Crime Scene Investigator although the book is more geared toward to interested readers from New Jersey, but that shouldn't deter anyone else at all. At the same time, the author lays out many of the basic principles and techniques of forensic science which make up the bulk of the book along with many colorful pictures including some macabre and gruesome ones.

As for anyone else who is very interested in becoming a photographer for a law enforcement agency, To Be a Crime Scene Investigator is an excellent start because the author really gets into that area in an extensive detail. The third part deals with the crime scene and how the procedures are applied in a very matter of factly way. I thought at this point I really learned the system in a step-by-step method; of course, this is only a beginner's book which at any time of the reading would give you an idea of a good start to further explore the subject the author brings up. Yet in To Be a Crime Scene Investigator, the author is very good in laying out the points that don't feel over-explained or too short of information.

In a way, I can't help but feel that a criminal could be benefitting too much from reading this sort of a book as way of how to avoid detection. I am sure that kind of thinking applies well to serial killers. Also, in this chapter and elsewhere, there is a definition of different technicians and the description of the job. The author covers also the stages of body decomposition, the different ways of detecting blood, fibers, materials, and DNA to name a few; the science of them, the technology used, the ideas of how they can be found, and how to procure the samples without contamination or being declared inadmissible in the court of law.

As I mentioned about the photography, the author goes ahead and explains how one ought to take pictures, how go to do the job, and how to do it the right way in many ways possible including the technical details of the camera and the rolls. Part Four deals with the transition from crime scene to lab; obviously, in short, what to do with the evidence and how to transport it are covered. As 9/11 happened in NYC, the author makes a special mention about it as 21st century has come which has changed the thinking of law enforcement when it comes to dealing with terrorism, so the author feels compelled in incorporating ways of battling the new problem in terms of crime solving skills. In this part, the author makes a mention of the bomb department which plays an important role in a crime solving team.

Two more things I forget to mention is that the author explains the interrogative tactics used by the police for both criminals and victims and the job of the forensic pathologist and what officially happens during the autopsy. Last part of the book deals with serial crimes which has usually gotten the most attention over the years and have served as a fascination by the audience but has really lost its flair. When you think about this fifth part, you think of Noah Cross played by Morgan Freeman. That's what the author explains about especially in terms of behavioral analysis and profiling. Speaking of movie characters, the author from time to time dispels myths spurned out by the Hollywood films just to clear things up. I think I've covered a lot of areas as possible, but whatever else not mentioned, the book will already have covered it. All in all, To Be a Crime Scene Investigator is an excellent book that shouldn't fail to satisfy anyone's curiosity and/or desire to become a Crime Scene Investigator, and for me, I feel like I got a bang out of my money.

The Library Journal said of Living and Working Aboard the International Space Station, “Designed for both research and leisure reading, each book packs quite a bit of to-the-point information into a few pages. These volumes are laid out as though readers were viewing the pages on a computer screen, which may or may not appeal to students. However, this goes along with the proposed idea of these books as doorways to additional up-to-date resources accessed through the publisher's Web site. Living and Working follows the history of the space station from its inception to its future uses. These discussions cover the spacecraft's construction, its habitability for astronauts, and its dangers. Challenger follows the story of the ill-fated mission, complete with the final results of the cause of the accident and any associated culpability of NASA and others. While the presentation is succinct, it is not always interesting. Good-quality, full-color photos serve to illuminate both texts. These attractive, attention-getting books and the associated Web sites should satisfy students and entice them to seek out additional sources.”

According to the book description of To Be A U.S. Air Force Pilot, it “details every step of training for those with the skill and daring to "cross into the blue" as an elite U.S. Air Force pilot. The book traces the growth of aspiring young recruits, starting with grueling physical and mental tests, early flight training on high-tech flight simulators, moving onward and upward until they are finally ready to push the outer envelope to Mach II in state-of-the-art fighter aircraft. Thanks to the highly motivated, highly skilled, and dedicated men and women of the United States Air Force, America enters the uncertain landscape of the 21st century with the most powerful, swift, and flexible military force the world has ever seen.”


To Be an FBI Special Agent (To Be A)
Henry Holden  More Info

To Be a U.S. Secret Service Agent (To Be A)
Henry Holden  More Info


To Be a U.S. Air Force Pilot (To Be A)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

FBI 100 Years: An Unofficial History
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Navy Combat Aircraft and Pilots (Aircraft)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

The Tragedy of the Space Shuttle Challenger (Space Flight Adventures and Disasters)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Woodrow Wilson (Presidents)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Wisconsin (States)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

The Persian Gulf War (U.S. Wars)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Living and Working Aboard the International Space Station: A MyReportLinks.com Book (Space Flight Adventures and Disasters)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Rescue Helicopters and Aircraft
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Pioneering Astronaut Sally Ride: A Myreportlinks.Com Book (Space Flight Adventures and Disasters)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

The Supersonic X-15 and High-Tech Nasa Aircraft
Henry M. Holden  More Info

To Be a Crime Scene Investigator (To Be A)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

American Women of Flight: Pilots and Pioneers (Collective Biographies)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Crime-Fighting Aircraft
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Black Hawk Helicopter (Aircraft)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Air Force Aircraft
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Fire-Fighting Aircraft and Smoke Jumpers (Aircraft)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

The American Alligator (Endangered and Threatened Animals)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Coast Guard Rescue and Patrol Aircraft
Henry M. Holden  More Info

New Jersey (States)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Trailblazing Astronaut John Glenn (Space Flight Adventures and Disasters)
Henry M. Holden  More Info

Triumph over Disaster Aboard Apollo 13 (Space Flight Adventures and Disasters)
Henry M. Holden  More Info
Ladybirds II: The Continuing Story of American Women in Aviation
Henry M. Holden  More Info
Her Mentor Was an Albatross: The Autobiography of Pioneer Pilot Harriet Quimby
Henry M. Holden  More Info
The Fabulous Ford Tri-Motors (Flying Classics Series)
Henry M. Holden  More Info
Ladybirds II: The Continuing Story of American Women in Aviation
Henry M. Holden  More Info
Aerial drug wars: The story of U.S. Customs aviation
Henry M Holden  More Info
The Legacy of the DC-3
Henry M. Holden  More Info
Hovering: The History of the Whirly-Girls : International Women Helicopter Pilots
Henry M. Holden  More Info
Women in Aviation: Leaders and Role Models for the 21st Century
Henry M. Holden  More Info

About the Orange County Sheriff's Department
According to the Orange County Sheriff’s Department (Florida), “The first sheriff of Orange County dates from the earliest days of Florida's statehood in 1845. On January 31, 1845, the area was known as Mosquito County in Territorial Florida was renamed Orange County, a name reflective of the spreading blanket of orange groves throughout the region. Less than six weeks later, on March 3, 1845, Florida's status as a territory was changed to that of statehood. The first statewide election was conducted on May 26, 1845. William Henry Williams was elected to serve as Orange County's first sheriff.”

 

Today, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department is a full service law enforcement agency which employees over 2,400 employees with a budget of over 140 million dollars.  The Orange County Sheriff’s Department is organized into three divisions: Uniformed Patrol, Investigative Divisions and Administrative Divisions.  In addition to being one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the Southeast United States, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department is unique in that unlike most sheriff agencies it does not manage the county jails.  Management of the Orange County inmate population is accomplished the Orange County Corrections Department, a separate entity.

 

Source:

osco.com

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