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James W. Smith

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James W. Smith, sometimes publishing under the name Jim Smith, worked as a Memphis Police Department police officer for 8 years during the 1960’s while earning a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Memphis. Although he left the full-time employment of the Memphis Police Department for a career in medical sales, he remained a reserve officers, serving an additional 17 years. During his career with the Memphis Police Department he was assigned the Narcotics Squad, Vice Squad, Organized Crime Unit, and General Investigations.

After retiring from the Memphis Police Department he was appointed a Criminal Investigator with the District Attorney’s Office in 1990, assigned to Grand Jury investigations where he investigated fatal shootings by law enforcement officers and misconduct by police officers. He also served on an FBI Crime Task Force and was deputized as a Special Deputy U.S. Marshal.  He is the author of Operation Sorespot; From the Internet with Love; and Fort Defiance.

According to the book description of Fort Defiance, “A routine murder investigation leads District Attorney Investigator Jake Shannon neck deep into a life-and-death struggle. The body of a young teenage boy is found dumped in City Park in Bartlett, Tennessee, a suburb of Memphis. Jake is called in to assist in the investigation. He is deeply shaken when he discovers the young boy is a close personal friend. Jake is already investigating possible political corruption in the Bartlett city administration, which has led to clashes between him, the Bartlett mayor, and the newly appointed chief of the Bartlett police department. As Shannon moves forward with the murder investigation these clashes become more frequent and more intense. Jake’s roommate and lover, Rachel Morgan, is a homicide detective with the Memphis police department. She is under tremendous pressure to catch a serial rapist who is terrorizing a neighborhood in midtown Memphis. The stress and pressure from their individual investigations threaten their already fragile relationship. Jake’s murder investigation and his investigation of political corruption appear to be related when he discovers that automatic rifles are being stolen from the Bartlett High School ROTC armory, and sold to a white supremacy group. Attempts to get him off the case come from several sources. Everything from bribery to threats of physical harm is used to stop his inquiries. Unidentified assailants target Jake and Rachel. He puts everything on the line: his job, his love, his life. Things quickly spin out of control, and Jake finds he must solve both the murder case and the corruption case before he and Rachel become the next murder victims.”

According to the book description of Operation Sorespot, “Who really killed Dr. Martin Luther King, and why? District Attorney Investigator Jake Shannon never completely believed the government’s version of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King. Twenty-five years after the assassination, documents surface that support many of his suspicions. These documents are the only evidence to support his theories. Government agents are tipped to Jake’s plan to expose the newly discovered papers and he must call upon every skill he has ever learned as a police officer and intelligence officer to beat them to the files.”

One reader of Operation Sorespot said, “This is a great book. It really gets you hooked from the very beginning. The book is fictional but based on fact, so I learned a lot about the events that lead up to the Martin Luther King Jr. assassination. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in governmental corruption and conspiracy theories.”

One reader of Operation Sorespot, “Living through this time, we knew there was more to the assassination of Martin Luther King! Operation Sorespot, although fictional in some areas, sheds the most light on this assassination than any other written. As the daughter of a retired homicide detective from NYPD, it's written in the investigative-style that states the facts yet is fast paced in an incredibly captivating style. Thank you for a wonderful book that gets us to the 'meat' of the matter - what actually was taking place?”


Fort Defiance
Jim Smith  More Info

Operation Sorespot
Jim Smith  More Info

From the Internet With Love
Jim Smith  More Info

According to the book description of From the Internet With Love, “Immediately after the tragic events of September 11, 2001, people began sending messages to friends and loved ones, some of whom they had not contacted in years. A new mode of instant communication was set into motion. The Internet was jammed with e-mails containing everything from pictures of the disaster to prayers from well-wishers. Many commentaries surfaced on how we should face this disaster. Patriotism was reborn in the United States. People with little or no previous knowledge of computers soon began learning to navigate the Internet and send e-mail. Most of the first messages exuded anger and sadness, followed by messages of patriotic and religious content. Later, after the trauma and disbelief had subsided, the Internet user’s mood changed to more revitalizing and up-lifting messages. Soon jokes, political pundits and personal commentaries seemed to dominate the e-mail messages. The healing had begun.”

About the Memphis Police Department

In 1827, John J. Balch was appointed town constable. This was the birth of the Memphis Police Department. Several years later, a town watch was created with two men paid $400 a year to work the night watch.  The first police station was constructed. It was a 12' by 20' brick calaboose located at Main and Market, at a cost of $185. Rattles were purchased for the night watch.  

 

Today, the Memphis Police Department is organized into four large organizational entities: Special Operations; Uniform Patrol; Investigative Services; and, Administrative Services.  The department employs over 2,700 people, including over 2,000 sworn officers (1400 of the sworn officers are police officers). In 2005, the police officers working in uniform handled more than 817,000 calls for service.

 

Source:

memphispolice.org

 

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