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Jef Nance

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Jef Nance is a certified fraud examiner, former undercover narcotics agent trooper with the Missouri State Highway Patrol.  He is the author of Conquering Deception. 

According to the book description, “Conquering Deception delivers the tools to recognize the hidden meanings of what others say using principles originated by America's savviest police investigators. Conquering Deception adapts these principles for use in any setting--business or personal--to be used in an informal and non-confrontational style. A handbook for the savvy conversationalist that is practical, effective, and one-of-a-kind.

Ever wonder if you’re hearing the WHOLE story in a conversation? Conquering Deception delivers the tools to recognize the hidden meanings of what others say using principles originated by America's savviest police investigators. Conquering Deception adapts these principles for use in any setting--business or personal--to be used in an informal and non-confrontational style. A handbook for the savvy conversationalist that is practical, effective, and one-of-a-kind.

A few highlights: interpreting eye movements, ways to pose questions that always get honest answers, dispelling myths of lying, using agreement to our advantage in conversation, the amazing significance of hearing a person say "I think...," techniques for influencing others, using silence as a 'weapon,' recognizing nose gestures, judging deception without being accusatory.”

One reader of Conquering Deception said, “This book is quite effective (maybe too effective) at translating police interrogation tactics in a way that you can use in everyday conversations, and like the literature says, you don't have to be overly inquisitive or accusatory to make them work. I say 'maybe too effective' because I'm not sure that the average person needs to be privy to this information. Like the author, I'm a former police officer. I liked the book, and as above, it's highly effective--but this is material that the average officer doesn't even know, much less the average citizen. It is powerful stuff--if these principles of conversation have been used to get suspects to confess to murdering another person, it's easy to see that they would be powerful in everyday conversation.”

One reader of Conquering Deception said “Jef Nance, a former police interrogator pulls no punches is this informative book. After reading and actually applying some of what I learned, I realized how powerful this information is. The information herein not only can help one to detect deception but also can help one to become better at reading people for other purposes.

Conquering Deception is written from the standpoint of a police detective who has years of experience in interrogating people. Putting the information in this book to use doesn't require that you go around interrogating people. The author points out that the best interrogations don't seem like interrogations because he talks about "mirroring" the other person's "plane of navigation" and putting the person at ease. When asking people harmless questions, I have become more observant of which direction the eyes break contact, nose rubs, and scratching the temples (which isn't mentioned in this book). After thinking about what was asked, the response and the accompanying behavior; I was to a large extent able to tell when someone was trying to deceive me. In meeting people in everyday life, conquering deception can tell us whether or not we're going to get hired after an interview or whether or not a member of the opposite sex is really interested in us. Chapter 7 "The Eyes Have It" and the discussion on page 185 about the "three whites of the eyes" are by far the best parts of the book because the eyes can tell us so much about a person's true mental state.”

Applying the information will require patience and practice. One can become a true pro at reading people from the powerful information contained herein.”

One reader of Conquering Deception said, “This book is quite effective (maybe too effective) at translating police interrogation tactics in a way that you can use in everyday conversations, and like the literature says, you don't have to be overly inquisitive or accusatory to make them work. I say 'maybe too effective' because I'm not sure that the average person needs to be privy to this information. Like the author, I'm a former police officer. I liked the book, and as above, it's highly effective--but this is material that the average officer doesn't even know, much less the average citizen. It is powerful stuff--if these principles of conversation have been used to get suspects to confess to murdering another person, it's easy to see that they would be powerful in everyday conversation.”

About the Missouri State Highway Patrol

The Missouri State Highway Patrol was created in 1931 by an act of the 56th Missouri General Assembly, during the tenure of Governor Henry S. Caulfield. Although this new Highway Patrol's authorized strength was set at 125 uniformed officers, due to limited appropriations, the Patrol began with 55 officers and a handful of civilians. By the 2000s the Missouri State Highway Patrol has grown to include more than 1,400 uniformed civilians and support staff, and 1,100 uniformed members. The Patrol operated as an independent agency under the control of the executive branch until the Omnibus State Reorganization Act of 1974 made it a division of the Department of Public Safety.

 

Since its inception in 1931, the Missouri State Highway Patrol has evolved from simply a highway patrolling force to a full-service, accredited law enforcement agency. While enforcing traffic laws and promoting safety on Missouri's approximately 33,000 miles of state-maintained highways remains the Patrol's primary responsibility, the Patrol has been tasked by the Governor and the legislature with many additional law enforcement duties including: motor vehicle inspection, commercial vehicle enforcement, driver's license examinations, criminal investigations, criminal laboratory analysis and research, public education, gaming enforcement, law enforcement training, and more.

 

In 1992 the Missouri State Highway Patrol became only the 10th State Police/Highway Patrol to receive accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. This accreditation demonstrates the Patrol's commitment to professionalism and acceptance of high standards of excellence in law enforcement. This process also provides an ongoing evaluation of the Patrol's policies and procedures so that it may continue to grow and improve in the future

 

Source:

mshp.dps.missouri.gov

/MSHPWeb/about the

Patrol/History/History.html

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