police and law enforcement equipment
                              by US Cavalry

Police Books

John Dillmann

Home | By Police Department | By Police Officer | By Police Subjects | Law Enforcement Books by State | Other Law Enforcement Writers | Poetry, Prayers & Articles | FAQs | Contact Us | Site Map

Trends, tactics and terrorism - Open Source Information for law Enforcement
Hi Tech Criminal Justice online
 Join our Newsletter
 Enter Your Email:
Privacy Policy

Visit the New Orleans Police Department website.


Unholy Matrimony
John Dillmann  More Info
THE FRENCH QUARTER KILLERS.
John DILLMANN  More Info
Blood Warning: The true story of the New Orleans slasher
John Dillmann  More Info
Deadly Weekend: A True Story of Obsession and Murder
John Dillmann  More Info

About the New Orleans Police Department
New Orleans became a part of the United States by the Louisiana Purchase on December 20, 1803. The city limits at that time were in the restricted boundaries of Canal Street on the South, Esplanade Street on the North, the Ramparts on the West and the levee on the East. Beyond that, there was nothing but swamps and plantations. In 1804 came the patrol militia under James Pitot, the then Mayor of New Orleans. The Guard Deville (City Watch) followed in 1806 but was abolished in 1808. Militia patrols were again established. By 1817, with the growth of the city, the number of constables increased to 46 and for the first time, the city was divided into police districts - French Quarter, Faubourg’s Treme, St. Mary and Marigny. A Guard House was placed in each district. Today, the New Orleans Police Department is organized into five bureaus who report to the Superintendent of Police: Bureau of Investigations; Operations Bureau; Criminal Intelligence Bureau; Public Integrity Bureau; and, Administrative and Support Bureau.  A deputy chief in charge of policing and planning also reports to the New Orleans Police Department Superintendent of Police. 

The Operations Bureau is the largest, with over 17 divisions and 1700 commissioned police officers.

John Dillmann was a highly-decorated, veteran Homicide Detective for the New Orleans Police Department has written several true crime books.  As an example, in “Deadly Weekend,” John tells the story of his investigation into the disappearance of Mark Sheppard, a 50-year-old M.D. from St. Petersburg, Florida. According to one reviewer, “With the discovery of the doctor's nude body, the case took a new and grisly turn which led down the treacherous streets of the Big Easy and into the darkest secrets of a respected physician described as 'a murder waiting to happen.”

Publishers Weekly said of Blood Warning: The true Story of the New Orleans Slasher, “Dillmann's third classic police procedural (after Unholy Matrimony ) describes another real case, although some of the characters have been given fictitious names. A signal over the car radio informs veteran New Orleans detective John Dillmann that a murder has occurred; it is a crime of sensational violence that will be the most difficult case of his career. A few days after the murder of William Hines Jr., a gentle, much-loved proofreader for the New Orleans Times Picayune , there's another homicide, but this time the victim is black, an up-and-coming hotel executive who is young, not middle-aged. The only thing connecting the crimes is the modus operandi of the knife-wielding perpetrator. With Det. Fred Dantagnan and Patrolman John Reilly, Dillmann searches among the dregs of New Orleans society and finally comes up with a short list of unsavory suspects. How Dillmann sets about making the arrest, and how the murderer is finally brought to justice, make a riveting tale. A natural storyteller, Dillmann conveys considerable suspense--no mean trick when the story's a true one, already resolved. Literary Guild, Doubleday Book CLub and Mystery Guild alternates.”

© 2004 - 2017 Hi Tech Criminal Justice

 

Criminal Justice Online

Home/Join | List | Next | Previous | Random

Sponsored by Criminal Justice Online

2006 Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E. Foster

Disclaimer