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Although his father was a Mafia hitman, Lou Eppolito chose the uniform of the NYPD; and, became one of its most decorated cops.  Eppolito’s father, “Ralph Fat” Eppolito, was a Mafia hit-man. But, even Lou’s sterling record could not protect him when police brass decided to take him down. Lou Eppolito’s book, Mafia Cop, tells the story of the destruction of a good cop by his own police department. Although Lou Eppolito would be completely exonerated of charges of passing secrets to the mafia, he didn't stand a chance of regaining his dignity and his pride.

 

According to the book description of Mafia Cop, “He was one of the most decorated cops in the history of NYPD. From his "wiseguy" relatives, he learned the meaning of honor and loyalty. From his fellow cops, he learned the meaning of betrayal. His father, Ralph "Fat the Gangster" Eppolito, was stone-cold Mafia hit-man. Lou Eppolito, however, chose to live by different code; he chose the uniform of NYPD. And he was one of the best -- a good, tough, honest cop down the line. Butu even his sterling record, his headline-making heroism, couldn't protect him when the police brass decided to take him down. Although completely exonerated of charges that he had passed secrets to the mob, Lou didn't stand a chance. They had taken something from him they couldn't give back: his dignity and his pride.

 

Now, here's the powerful story, told in Lou Eppolito's own words, of the bloody Mafia hit that claimed his uncle and cousin...of his middle-of-the-night meeting with "Boss of Bosses" Paul Castellano...of one good cop who survived eight shootouts and saved hundreds of victims, who was persecuted, prosecuted, and ultimately betrayed by his own department. Full of hard drama and gritty truth, Mafia Cop gives a vivid, inside look at life in the Family, on the force, and on the mean streets of New York.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Mafia Cop
Lou Eppolito  More Info

About the New York Police Department (NYPD) 

The first law-enforcement officer began to patrol the trails and paths of New York City when it was known as New Amsterdam, and was a Dutch settlement and fort in the year 1625. This lawman was known as a "Schout – fiscal" (sheriff – attorney) and was charged with keeping the peace, settling minor disputes, and warning colonists if fires broke out at night. The first Schout was a man named Johann Lampo.

 

The Rattle Watch was a group of colonists during the Dutch era (1609 - 1664) who patrolled from sunset until dawn. They carried weapons, lanterns and wooden rattles (that are similar to the ratchet noisemakers used during New Year celebrations). The rattles made a very loud, distinctive sound and were used to warn farmers and colonists of threatening situations. Upon hearing this sound, the colonists would rally to defend themselves or form bucket-brigades to put out fires. The rattles were used because whistles had not yet been invented. The Rattle Watchmen also are believed to have carried lanterns that had green glass inserts. This was to help identify them while they were on patrol at night (as there were no streetlights at that time). When they returned to their Watch House from patrol, they hung their lantern on a hook by the front door to show that the Watchman was present in the Watch House. Today, green lights are still hung outside the entrances of Police Precincts as a symbol that the "Watch" is present and vigilant.

 

When the High Constable of New York City, Jacob Hays retired from service in 1844, permission was granted by the Governor of the state to the Mayor of the City to create a Police Department. A force of approximately 800 men under the first Chief of Police, George W. Matsell, began to patrol the City in July of 1845. They wore badges that had an eight-pointed star (representing the first 8 paid members of the old Watch during Dutch times). The badges had the seal of the City in their center and were made of stamped copper.

 

Source:

nycpolicemuseum.org

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