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Michael Cordoni

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Michael Cordoni is the pen name of a former New Orleans Police Department police officer.  According to the book description of Peaches and Snitches, “A tactless, devastatingly honest and furiously witty sergeant will take you on a back-seat ride to show you how the crime-solving business always takes care of itself while his not so private business leaves you wondering whether you ever wanted to know all that much about the people sworn to serve and protect. Sergeant Dresdin, our conflicted wanna-be hero, freely sheds his cape and bare-nakedly chases after a killer and the one thing that threatens his case and his humanity: his partner's love.”  The author’s real name and contact information are on file with the editor of Police-Writers.com.

According to the book description of Peaches & Snitches, “A tactless, devastatingly honest and furiously witty sergeant will take you on a back-seat ride to show you how the crime-solving business always takes care of itself while his not so private business leaves you wondering whether you ever wanted to know all that much about the people sworn to serve and protect. Sergeant Dresdin, our conflicted wanna-be hero, freely sheds his cape and bare-nakedly chases after a killer and the one thing that threatens his case and his humanity: his partner's love.”

One reader of Peaches & Snitches said, “Mr. Cordini writes this book as if he doesn’t care how the reader will react when one reads the first few pages of this book. I was in total shock. The readings will take you straight to biggest jail in America if you follow any of the malice that this book has to offer. My advice is to spread Vaseline around your wrist because you won't get out of the handcuffs that will be holding you when you attempt to take a break from the book. The main character has a love affair with foul police tactics but for some reason his partner is very loyal to him. It took me about 3 weeks to read and I really was surprised by the way some cops really are if they are not getting the "cat out of the tree for the little ole lady". Although some of the language is not very healthy I still managed to sift through it and I can actually say it is a well drafted book. Beware!!! If you never read a book of this nature, I advise you to put on your sunshades, some of that Vaseline that I mentioned and some knee pads because this book will burn a hole in your Christian sole.”


Peaches and Snitches
Michael Cordoni  More Info

One reader of Peaches & Snitches said, “I didn't know what to expect when I started to read this book. Once I started I couldn't stop. The book sets the tone in the first chapter and never looks back. A very fast paced book I couldn't put down until it was over. The story gives the reader an inside look at how things get done when things get messed up. The book gets very graphic in a couple of areas but this only lends to the credibility of the story. The "scenes" are done out of respect for the Book and add to it. I liked Peaches very much and would recommend this book to just about anyone.”

About the New Orleans Police Department

New Orleans became a part of the United States by the Louisiana Purchase on December 20, 1803. The city limits at that time were in the restricted boundaries of Canal Street on the South, Esplanade Street on the North, the Ramparts on the West and the levee on the East. Beyond that, there was nothing but swamps and plantations. In 1804 came the patrol militia under James Pitot, the then Mayor of New Orleans. The Guard Deville (City Watch) followed in 1806 but was abolished in 1808. Militia patrols were again established. By 1817, with the growth of the city, the number of constables increased to 46 and for the first time, the city was divided into police districts - French Quarter, Faubourg’s Treme, St. Mary and Marigny. A Guard House was placed in each district.

Today, the New Orleans Police Department is organized into five bureaus who report to the Superintendent of Police: Bureau of Investigations; Operations Bureau; Criminal Intelligence Bureau; Public Integrity Bureau; and, Administrative and Support Bureau.  A deputy chief in charge of policing and planning also reports to the New Orleans Police Department Superintendent of Police.

The Operations Bureau is the largest, with over 17 divisions and 1700 commissioned police officers.

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