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Pleasant Hill Police Department

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Visit the Pleasant Hill Police Department (California) website.

John Schembra

About the Pleasant Hill Police Department

The Pleasant Hill Police Department was established in 1970, under the direction of Chief of Police Edward S. Kreins.  Currently, the Pleasant Hill Police Department is organized into five divisions:  Administration, Patrol, Investigations, Support Services and Traffic.

 

The Administration Division is under the jurisdiction of the Chief of Police. In addition to overseeing the total operation of the Department, the Chief is also responsible for carrying out the policy and direction of the City Manager and City Council, and for guiding the direction of the Department in its daily operation. Other responsibilities include liaison with citizens and other agencies in the criminal justice system, budgeting, discipline, hiring, and other management duties.

 

The Patrol Division consists of one Lieutenant, four Sergeants, four Corporals, twenty officers and two traffic officers. The officers work a modified shift schedule that involves a twelve- hour workday. Each police car is outfitted with a computer system allowing officer’s access to the Wanted Persons Systems, DMV, and in-house records. This allows officers

 

The Detective Bureau consists of a Lieutenant, Sergeant, 3 Detectives, School Resource Officer, Youth Services Counselor, Narcotic (CNET) Officer, Community Resource Officer, Secretary and a Community Service Officer. The Detective Bureau is responsible for conducting follow up investigations in regards to Felony offenses. The types of crimes followed up by Detectives include the following: aggravated assaults, arson, auto theft, burglaries, child abuse, elder abuse, forgery, grand theft, identity theft, robbery and sexual assault. Detectives are also responsible for following up missing person cases, registering narcotic and sex offenders, writing of search warrants and filing cases at the District Attorney’s Office.

 

The Support Services Division is the second largest division in the Department. This Division is staffed by one Lieutenant, a civilian Support Services Manager and 18 civilian employees. The civilian employees include dispatcher teams, community service officers and a computer technician. Operating 24 hours a day, the division provides dispatching, records, technical services, evidence and property, and supplies for the entire department.

 

The Traffic Division consists of officers riding Harley Davidison motorcycles. The use of motorcycles allow officers better accessibility to traffic related problems. A motorcycle officer can better address red light violations at an intersection than an officer working in a patrol car. It is the mission of the Traffic Division to create safe roadways for all. This is accomplished through education, addressing matters related to engineering, and enforcement.

 

Traffic officers not only enforce traffic laws but also investigate serious injury and fatal traffic collisions. All traffic officers have received specialized training in traffic investigation and have completed a POST (Commission on Police Officer’s Standards and Training) approved motorcycle training course.

 

Source:

pleasanthillpd.com/index.html

Selected book by a Pleasant Hill Police Department police officer.


MP
John Schembra  More Info

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