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Randy E. Narramore

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Randy E. Narramore is the Chief of Police of the Huntington Park Police Department (California). He has dedicated the past twenty-six years of his life to law enforcement. Chief Randy Narramore has an A.S. Degree in Police Science, a B.S. Degree in Administration of Justice, and a Masters Degree in Public Administration. He is also a graduate of the FBI. National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. He has received numerous professional awards and has earned all of California's Peace Officer Standards and Training Certificates. Chief Randy Narramore also has extensive experience as a college instructor.

Chief Randy E. Narramore is the author of How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Law Enforcement Officer; How to Become an Emergency Dispatcher; The Law Enforcement Assessment Center; How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Firefighter; How to Pass the Written Exam for Police Officer; How to Pass the Written Exam for Police Supervisor; and, How to Prepare for a Law Enforcement Promotional Interview.

According to the book description of How to Prepare for a Law Enforcement Promotional Interview, “A basic guide for Law Enforcement Officers wishing to become involved in the area of supervision. Includes information on: A Proven Guide to Interview Success, How to Prepare Your Resume, How to Dress for the Interview, Proper Responses to Questions, What To Do After the Interview. Written by Randy Narramore, twenty-six year law enforcement veteran and current Chief of Police in Huntington Park, California.”

According to the book description of How to Pass the Written Exam for Police Officer, “A basic guide for anyone who wants to become a Police Officer. Includes information on: How to Find a Job, How to Prepare Your Application, How to Take a Written Examination, and Practice Questions and Answers. Written by Randy Narramore, twenty-six year law enforcement veteran and current Chief of Police of Huntington Park, California.”

According to the book description of How to Pass the Written Exam for Police Supervisor, “A basic guide for Law Enforcement Officers. Includes information on: How to Prepare Your Application, How to Prepare Your Resume, How to Perform During Your Interview, How to Dress for the Interview, and Sample Questions and answer.”

According to the book description of How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Firefighter, “This manual is a comprehensive and highly supportive guide for those persons who want to become a firefighter. This manual is loaded with advice for developing personal confidence and direction within your career. Includes information on: How to Prepare Your Application, How to Prepare Your Resume, How to Perform During Your Interview, How to Dress for the Interview, and Sample Question and Answers. This manual will accompany you every step of the way on your goal of becoming a Firefighter!”

One reader of How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Firefighter said, “This book was extremely helpful. From the quick tips on how to dress down to the questions/answers listed. I found it easy to read and follow. I was shocked when I went to my interview and I was asked several questions that were EXACTLY the same as the ones offered in the book.  Of course, prior preparation helped too, but this book is definitely a must buy for anyone pursuing a career in fire suppression.”

According to the book description of How to Become an Emergency Dispatcher, “includes information on: How to Prepare Your Application, How to Prepare Your Resume, How to Perform During Your Interview, How to Dress for the Interview, and Sample Questions and Answers.”

One reader of How to Become an Emergency Dispatcher said,, “This book is a must for anyone who wants to be a 911 Dispatcher!  The most helpful section in the book to me was the frequently asked questions in an oral board interview, how to answer these questions, and how to prepare for the oral board interview.  MANY of the questions in the book were actually asked in my oral board interview!! And, having read the book, I felt confident and knew how to prepare and answer the questions effectively.”

One reader of The Law Enforcement Assessment Center said, “Another good assessment center preparation book. This has a lot of good information in it, and is a great tool for your promotional arsenal.”

One reader of How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Law Enforcement Officer said, “This book has a narrow focus that addresses one of the most challenging parts of the application process.  It has the information you need, but it is only 54 pages which makes it expensive when you add shipping as well.  For me this book was worth the cost as I'm trying to give myself every advantage possible, but if you're on a budget, you might want to consider getting a more general book first and then buying this only if you are still concerned about how your oral interview might go.”

One reader of How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Law Enforcement Officer said, “Being that I am taking steps to enter law enforcement, this book was a great help. The introduction explained all of the options for law enforcement and what each involved.  The most help to me was the practice questions for the oral exam. Many of these questions were somewhat addressed, and it helped me properly prepare for my future career. I will guarantee that they have some of the same types of questions that you will be asked for departments such as LAPD and BHPD.  Good luck with your future careers, and if you really want a jump ahead of the rest, purchase this book.”


How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Firefighter
Randy Narramore  More Info

How to Become an Emergency Dispatcher
Randy Narramore  More Info

The Law Enforcement Assessment Center
Randy Narramore  More Info

How to Prepare for a Law Enforcement Promotional Interview
Randy Narramore  More Info

How to Pass the Written Exam for Police Supervisor
Randy Narramore  More Info

How to Prepare for an Interview and Obtain a Job as a Law Enforcement Officer
Randy Narramore  More Info

How to Pass the Written Exam for Police Officer
Randy Narramore  More Info
Law enforcement officer: How to become a law enforcement officer
Randy E Narramore  More Info

About the Huntington Park Police Department

The City of Huntington Park was founded in 1906 and from it's inception, has had it's own Municipal Police Department. Originally a one man Department with a City Marshal, the department grew as did the City. Following World War One, the size of the Department increased to a Marshal and four Deputies. The new Deputies wore their Army uniforms as Police uniforms.

 

The Policemen remained Deputies until 1932. The title "Deputy" was changed to "Policeman" in 1933. Following the Long Beach Earthquake of 1933, where many buildings in Huntington Park were damaged, the Huntington Park Police Department was built on the Southeast corner of Gage and Pacific. During this period, the majority of the police officers on the Department were motorcycle traffic officers. Their uniforms were tan while the regular Patrol Officers began wearing blue. When a motorcycle officer was hired on, he was issued a badge and a hat badge. He provided his weapon, uniform and motorcycle.

 

Police cars didn't have police radios so several "Police Call Boxes were positioned around the City. Whenever the station received a call for assistance, the Police Operator would activated a red light which was atop several tall towers throughout the City. The Policeman, on patrol, would need to routinely look for the tower light and when seeing the light, he would call the station from one of the many call boxes. This system was discontinued in the mid-1940's when the Department was equipped with car radios and a main station radio however, the call boxes remained until the mid 1970's.

 

During World War Two, many of our Policemen volunteered for Military service. The Department supplemented the patrol force and the Civil Defense Force with Home Volunteers. These Volunteers wore a "Reserve Police" armband over their civilian clothing while serving their assignments. In 1943, the Huntington Park Police began wearing Police Patches on their uniform shirts. The Patrol Officer's patch depicted "Electrical Bolts" representing the newly equipped police cars with radios. The Motorcycle Officer's patch depicted the 'winged Wheel" of the Motor Officer Following World War Two, the Department retained many of the war time volunteers and trained them as Reserve Officers.

 

The Reserve Officers were issued their own style of badge, however, they wore the same patch as the regular officers. The new Civic Center was built in 1950 and while the Police Facility was being completed for the following year, the temporary Police Department was installed in the basement of the City Hall. The jail cells are still in the basement of City Hall today.

 

The Police "Justice Building" was opened in 1951. This building contained the Police Department, Jail, District Attorney's Office, Public Defenders and a Court Room.  To coincide with moving into a new Police Facility, the Department issued new Police Patches, a new badge, and new uniform regulations.

 

Dark Blue long sleeve shirts were worn from October 1st until May 1st. The Summer uniform was a short sleeved light blue shirt. The patches are the same design as are worn today. In 1976, an order was made for additional patches and a numbering error resulted in a light blue police patch. These patches were issued as replacement patches for the Summer uniform, however, they were not well received by the officers Ironically, soon afterwards, the Huntington Park Police Officers Association convinced the Chief to discontinue the light blue shirts.

 

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