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Shane Moore

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Shane Moore is a detective with the Gillespie Police Department (Illinois).  His debut novel is A Prisoner's Welcome.  Shane Moore describes his work as a fantasy similar to Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter, but with much heavier writing and themes which are best suited for the adult reader.

Shane Moore is the author of Albion: Peace in our Time; The Trial of Innocence; Darrion-Quieness; The Breach of Crowns; Albion; The Plea of Apollisian; and A Prisoner’s Welcome.

According to the book description of The Plea of Apollisian, “On a dark misty morn under a silver sickle moon a child will be born to the fallen mistress of mercy. Within this child reside secrets as dark as any moonless night yet a bright desire for good things befalls him. Many mystics and shamans have foretold of it but no one headed there warning. until now. As the goddess of mercy falls from the heavens the world begins to unravel. The relationship of long time allies' strain under mounting pressure from unfair treatment forcing the hand of Clan Stoneheart's new leader. Tensions mount and talks waver as a division of warriors lead by a renegade general march in secret to bath Beykla in its own blood. Can one man stand against this onslaught of vengeance?. Will his own kingdom hear his plea?”

One reader of Albion said it “is a bit confusing to a Yank like me. The comics discussed are British in origin, but are no less fascinating. The writing is gripping and the art is fantastic. It has made me want to learn more about these characters, and can be considered another feather in Moore's cap.”

Booklist said of Albion, “Superstar comics scripter Moore made much of his early reputation by refurbishing hoary old superheroes with new trappings. Here he's up to the same trick, but Albion is unlikely to have the same impact, since the figures revived are from British boys' adventure comics of the 1960s and 1970s. The setup: the Spider, Grimly Feendish, the Steel Claw, and Captain Hurricane have been imprisoned by the government for decades, and now one of their daughters is out to free them. Obviously, the nostalgia factor that likely will make this a hit with British comics fans won't be in play on this side of the pond. Furthermore, Moore came up with only the plotline and left full scripting to his daughter, Leah, and her husband, John Reppion. They are capable but not in the same class as the elder Moore, who would have smoothed such rough edges as a critical lack of character development. Shane Oakley's visual approach dispenses with the dated looks of the original comics, but his decidedly modern style sacrifices clarity to flamboyance.”

According to the book description of Darrion-Quieness, “The drums of war echo through out the realm as the dwarven clan's march towards the gathering might of the Beyklans. While Lance fights to survive as a slave and Jude is forced to stand trial for murder the fates conspire to condemn the wicked god-king about the whispered prophecy. The world squirms against the confining grip of destiny unsure of its own fortitude and a growing fear that the fabric of existence will unravel in the path of the Abyss Walker?”

One reader of A Prisoner's Welcome said, it “is a rare fantasy that lacks the troupes of almost every fantasy novel out there. It starts out with young Lancalion searching for a person to read some parchments that are supposed to detail the murder of his parents-an orphan with power trying to discover the one responsible for his parents murder-SAME OLD troupe! That is where it all changes. Moore takes us on a whirlwind ride with politics. deceit, trickery, and backstabbing on a grand scale. You soon discover that young Lance is not the hero of the story, he is in fact the prophetic villain! Moore uses his police background to paint the thoughts of villains so accurately you begin to relate with them! I found myself pitying the monster that was directly responsible for the murder of thousands!

At the end of each chapter Moore has included a "reflection" where Lancalion speaks about that particular portion of the story and what his thoughts were at the time he experienced them.  This action packed Fantasy was loaded with symbolism and deep rooted societal issues that reminded me of a cross between Phil Dick and Robert Jordan. Much like Jordan, there was a little too much "fluff" at times, but it is clear Moore is well on his way to a great career as a writer!”


A Prisoner's Welcome
Shane Moore  More Info

The Plea of Apollisian
Shane Moore  More Info

Albion
Leah Moore  More Info

The Breach of Crowns
Shane Moore  More Info

Darrion-Quieness
Shane Moore  More Info

The Trial of Innocence
Shane Moore  More Info

Albion #4 (Peace in Our Time) June 2006
Alan Moore  More Info

According to the book description of The Trial of Innocence, “The deep heart of winter stirs within the shadows of the world. Its icy fingers stretch forth to cover the lands of man in a grip of frozen death. While the massive white dragon Darrion-Quieness considers the request from the bloodthirsty tyrant Hector De Scoran another associate of the cold steps into the contest against the warmth of man. Negative forces begin to show their hand as Lance struggles to understand his place in this world. Will he fulfill the murmured prophecy of be dragged into the Abyss like so many others.”

One reader/reviewer of Shane Moore’s novel said, “A Prisoner's Welcome is a rare fantasy that lacks the troupes of almost every fantasy novel out there. It starts out with young Lancalion searching for a person to read some parchments that are supposed to detail the murder of his parents-an orphan with power trying to discover the one responsible for his parents murder-SAME OLD troupe! That is where it all changes.

Moore takes us on a whirlwind ride with politics. deceit, trickery, and backstabbing on a grand scale. You soon discover that young Lance is not the hero of the story, he is in fact the prophetic villain! Moore uses his police background to paint the thoughts of villains so accurately you begin to relate with them! I found myself pitying the monster that was directly responsible for the murder of thousands!”

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