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G'd Up 24/7: The GHB Addiction Guide
Law Tech Publishing  More Info

About the Los Angeles Police Department
In February 1955, the Los Angeles Police Department, through the pages of the internally produced BEAT magazine, conducted a contest for a motto for the police academy. The conditions of the contest stated that: “The motto should be one that in a few words would express some or all the ideals to which the Los Angeles police service is dedicated. It is possible that the winning motto might someday be adopted as the official motto of the Department.” The winning entry was the motto, “To Protect and to Serve” submitted by Officer Joseph S. Dorobek.

 

“To Protect and to Serve” became the official motto of the Police Academy, and it was kept constantly before the officers in training as the aim and purpose of their profession. With the passing of time, the motto received wider exposure and acceptance throughout the department. On November 4, 1963, the Los Angeles City Council passed the necessary ordinance and the credo has now been placed alongside the City Seal on the Departments patrol cars.

Trinka Porrata has experience in both journalism and law enforcement, with expertise in sexual assaults, child abuse and narcotics, especially the “trendy drugs of abuse” (those used at rave parties, in the club scene and as weapons of rape).  Trinka Porrata retired from the Los Angeles Police Department, after a 25 year law enforcement career, in 1999 as a supervisor in street narcotics squads.  During the last 3 ½ years at LAPD, Porrata became a nationally recognized expert on flunitrazepam (Rohypnol or roofies), gamma hydroxy butyrate (GHB), MDMA (Ecstasy), ketamine (Special K) and LSD. 

 

Since retiring, Trinka Porrata has provided training, consultation and expert testimony on drug issues nationwide and internationally.  She has been interviewed worldwide about drug abuse and speaks to high school and college groups, parents, law enforcement, medical personnel, prosecutors and counselors.  Trinka Porrata is also president of Project GHB, a nonprofit organization working on drug-facilitated sexual assault, drug abuse prevention and treatment issues regarding GHB and other drugs, www.projectghb.org.  She operates a GHB Addiction Helpline via the site.  She is the editor of the new edition of Law Tech’s Drug ID & Symptoms Guide, 2007, and author of G'd Up 24/7: The GHB Addiction Guide.

 

According to the book description of G'd Up 24/7: The GHB Addiction Guide, “Gamma Hydroxy Butyrate (GHB) is a virtually invisible drug of abuse and is a far wider problem than statistics indicate due to its rapid escape from body fluids and complex testing issues. It is still a little-known drug in many areas, even to many law enforcement and medical personnel. GHB abuse literally originated in the bodybuilding and athletic arena and remains a serious, though often silent, problem there, co-existing with steroid abuse. Sadly, GHB addiction (use around the clock despite escalating adverse incidents) produces a potentially severe (even life endangering) and prolonged withdrawal syndrome. Withdrawal should be done with medical intervention and requires a longer period of detox than most drugs. Rehabilitation in its aftermath is also crucial as it produces profound depression, anxiety, lethargy and reduced ability to handle stress for many. This book is a compilation of the experiences of those who have come forward to Project GHB. It is dedicated to those Project GHB has been able to help and to those who couldn't be helped. Project GHB has accumulated a list of more than 330 GHB-related deaths. This book includes several chapters from major newspapers who have addressed the GHB addiction issue, including the NY Daily News, LA Times, Huntsville Times, Dallas Observer, and Tampa Tribune. Project GHB is thankful for their permission to reprint those articles. Important chapters by doctors and researchers (including Drs. Jo Ellen Dyer, Deborah Zvosec, Steve Smith, Alex & Janice Stalcup, Marco Sivilotti et al) are also included, making it a must-read for emergency medicine and addiction treatment professionals who have or may encounter GHB overdose and GHB withdrawal issues. It is also a must-read for jail & detention medical personnel and administrators as GHB addicts can and have died in custody for lack of medical intervention. It gives tremendous insight into the world of GHB addiction that is also beneficial to law enforcement and provides a great resource for addicts themselves and their families and friends. One chapter is dedicated to walking the addict through the battle with GHB with real hope for winning that battle. Another chapter is dedicated to guiding family and friends through the horror of GHB addiction with realistic expectations. The words of many GHB addicts are also included in the last segment, offering insight into their world, including the story of Mick Hart, a well-known UK bodybuilder who battled GHB addiction.”

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